Affenpinscher

Affenpinscher

Other Names

Affen
Affie
African Terrier
Monkey Dog
Monkey Terrier

Description

The Affenpinscher is a small dog with a shaggy, wiry-type coat. The hair on the face is longer than the rest of the body giving it a distinct look. It is a smaller version of a working terrier and is not a delicate dog. It has a square body, with a moderately broad, deep chest. The head is round with a pronounced stop, which is the transition area from the backskull to the muzzle. The lower jaw is undershot, and broad enough for the lower teeth to be straight and even, protruding below the dog’s short nose. The prominent, round eyes are black. The neck is short and arched and the limbs are straight and well boned. The tail is carried high and docked to two-thirds its length. The hairy ears are customarily docked, pointed and erect, however some countries have banned docking of animal’s tails and ears. The coat is usually black or dark gray, but can also come in lighter gray, silver, red, or black and tan. The undercoat is slightly curly.

Temperament

The Affenpinscher is a small dog with a shaggy, wiry-type coat. The hair on the face is longer than the rest of the body giving it a distinct look. It is a smaller version of a working terrier and is not a delicate dog. It has a square body, with a moderately broad, deep chest. The head is round with a pronounced stop, which is the transition area from the backskull to the muzzle. The lower jaw is undershot, and broad enough for the lower teeth to be straight and even, protruding below the dog’s short nose. The prominent, round eyes are black. The neck is short and arched and the limbs are straight and well boned. The tail is carried high and docked to two-thirds its length. The hairy ears are customarily docked, pointed and erect, however some countries have banned docking of animal’s tails and ears. The coat is usually black or dark gray, but can also come in lighter gray, silver, red, or black and tan. The undercoat is slightly curly.

Height/Weight

Height: 10 – 15 inches (25 – 38 cm)
Weight: 7 – 8 pounds (3 – 3.36 kg)

Health Problems

Some are prone to fractures, slipped stifle, PDA (patent ductus arteriosus), open fontanel and respiratory problems in hot weather.

Exercise

The Affenpinscher needs a daily walk. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog’s mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off lead, such as a large fenced-in yard. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans.

Life Expectancy

The Affenpinscher needs a daily walk. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog’s mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off lead, such as a large fenced-in yard. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans.

Litter Size

1 – 3 puppies, average 2

Grooming

The Affenpinscher’s harsh coat should never be clipped short because this ruins the coat for many years. It should be brushed and combed weekly and it may be necessary to pluck it. A dog-trimming specialist usually does this but it is possible to learn how to do it yourself. Show dogs require stripping. Hair sometimes grows in the corners of the eyes, causing irritation; they should be dealt with promptly. This breed sheds little to no hair.

Origin

No exact data about the Affenpinscher’s origin exists, but it is one of the most ancient of the toy breeds. It is certainly related to the Brussels Griffon and probably to the terrier. It’s named “Monkey Dog” because of its monkey-like facial structure and expression. It is believed that the Affenpinscher originated in Germany, and the name Affenpinscher translated from German is “Monkey Terrier.” It is believed that the first Affenpinschers were larger in size as they were farm dogs that worked as ratters. The Affenpinscher was miniaturized and became a house pet during the 18th and 19th centuries. It is still a ruthless hunter of mice and an outstanding watchdog. Today the Affenpinscher is primarily a companion dog. The Affenpinscher was admitted to the American Kennel Club’s studbook in 1936.